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shopon seo
Apr 11, 2022
In Australian Housing Market
Condemning opponents as fascists has long been a part of our political discourse, but the last decade has seen a rise in the popularity of the term. Critics increasingly invoked fascism to castigate the xenophobia, acceptance of violence, and sexism of the radical right around the world. Such was the case in France, for example, where the far-right National Front (renamed the National Rally in 2018) took advantage of voter discontent to become the second largest political force in the country. Even after its leader, Marine Le Pen, sought to sever the party's historical ties with Nazi sympathizers (even expelling her own father, Jean-Marie, for his notorious Holocaust denialism), the racism and eccentricities of its followers against "cosmopolitan elites" led scholars like Ugo Palheta to call it "fascism by another name". Narendra Modi's win in India and Jair Bolsonaro's in Brazil generated the same anxious rhetoric. The "fascist" label seemed to capture the departure from a standard conservative agenda on the part of these Whatsapp Mobile Number List all-out attack on legal equality, independent media, and political pluralism. The strongest “yes” to this question came from historian Timothy Snyder, who in a series of posts compared the Trump administration to the Nazi propaganda machine. Both regimes, he wrote in On Tyranny. Perhaps less expected was the growing popularity of the term in the United States. In the Trump era it became not just part of popular political discourse (figures ranging from Madeleine Albright to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez used it), but a category of academic analysis. Trump's racism and sexism clearly had their roots in recent American politics, but many also saw an alarming deviation in his rude style, his open threats to punish political opponents ("lock her up!"), and his lies. incessant. Could fascism be advancing in the country that once defeated it?
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